AFIEGO’s April 2022 newsletter

The newsletter which has the following content:

Power up the people! Address gaps in Electricity (Amendment) Bill!
Pictorial of our activities
Lobbying
In the media
Upcoming eventsAFIEGO’s April 2022 newsletter

Press statement -Bugoma forest communities evicted -28-April-2022-1

The press statement relays the following news among others:

The eviction by security forces of about 3,000 families from their farmlands around Bugoma forest;
The eviction of over 350 households from their homes around Bugoma forest;
Failure by government to conclude the Bugoma forest boundary opening, which has contributed to the eviction of the people.

Through the press statement, the Bugoma forest host communities make the following demands among others:

That the Kikuube district security committee led by the RDC explain how the eviction happened yet in previous meetings, the Ministry of Lands had promised that no community members would be evicted;
That the Ministry of Lands resumes the Bugoma forest boundary opening exercise to protect Bugoma forest and communities.Press statement -Bugoma forest communities evicted -28-April-2022

AFIEGO’s March 2022 newsletter

The newsletter which contains the following content:

Delayed justice: Judiciary must hear oil and environmental cases without delay to stop injustices
Pictorial of our activities
Lobbying
In the media
Upcoming eventsAFIEGO’s March 2022 newsletter

AFIEGO’s February 2022 newsletter

The newsletter which has the following content:
No clean energy, no poverty eradication! Gov’t must prioritise clean energy access for success of Parish Development Model
Pictorial of our activities
Lobbying
In the media
Upcoming eventsAFIEGO’s February 2022 newsletter

Factsheeet -EACOP case at the East African Court of Justice -February 2022

The factsheet discusses the existing and potential impacts of the EACOP project, as well as the laws violated by the project, that necessitated filing of the caseFactsheeet -EACOP case at the East African Court of Justice -February 2022

REPORT 7

The 2020 research, ‘Understanding the impact of a low carbon transition on Uganda’s planned oil industry’ examines the reduction in value of three main assets of Uganda’s oil: the oil fields; the East African Crude Oil Pipeline; and the Hoima oil refinery.
In their analysis, the authors note that since Uganda signed its initial production sharing agreements in 2013, the value of Uganda’s oil reserves has fallen by 70% and if the low-carbon transition continues, the value will drop further by 88%. Read More

REPORT 6

In July 2018, the Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment shared a review report of the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) for the Tilenga oil project with NEMA.
The gaps they noted in the report can be found here:Read More

REPORT 5

In March 2019, the Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment shared a review report of the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) for the Kingfisher oil project with NEMA.
In this review, they shared concerns related to well pads lying near or almost at the shore of Lake Albert, increasing pollution risks to the lake.
Read the report:

REPORT 4

In 2020, the Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment shared an Advisory Review of the resubmitted Environmental and Social Impact Assessment for the East Africa Crude Oil Pipeline (EACOP) project with NEMA.
In this review, NCEA was concerned that while they had suggested a number of changes to the ESIA in a July 2019 review, these were given either partial or insufficient treatment.
They for instance noted insufficient responses to concerns on expectation management, local content and jobs, water and wetland crossings, water use, biodiversity/chimpanzees’ conservation, compensation and resettlement issues and others.
Read their report here:

REPORT 3

In 2019, the Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment shared an Advisory Review of the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
for the East Africa Crude Oil Pipeline (EACOP) project with NEMA.
They noted a number of gaps in the report. These include shortcomings in the proposed technique for water and wetland crossings (open trench). This technique has the potential of significant negative impacts, particularly in wetlands.
They also noted that the number of jobs suitable for local workers is very limited.
Read the report here: